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20 years ago today

Posted Over 1 Year ago by I killed Mufasa

20 years ago today I was about a week into Grade 7 sitting in home room which was English class, and someone came to the door, and the teacher and the man talked outside, and the whole class was sent home. At that time I didn't really understand what was happening. 20 years later I do see. 9/11 was the first crack in the west's armour. The first signs of wear on our Pax Americana that we've enjoyed since 1945. It was the death of the innocence of the 90s, and indeed the innocence of my childhood. I was 12, so poetically, I went into my teenage years a little wiser and a little more cynical than I spent the first 12 years of my life. But 9/11 was only the first little hole in our defense. And it proved that we were vulnerable. Now we have recessions, riots, woke wankery, covid, scalping, chip shortages, the crazy Trump administration/culture, and the genuinely terrifying Biden administration.

9/11 ruined the future for Millennials and Gen Z in the west. Most of us will never own homes or be able to retire. Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe it was just as bad before 9/11. I mean certainly if you go back far enough it was. But WW1 and 2 barely touched North America directly. I'm from Halifax, the city the famous explosion happened in. You can barely tell that it happened when you walk around in Halifax, there are large fancy churches from the 1800s in that city. And that was the most devastating thing either of the large wars brought to the North American continent by far.

9/11 devastated our psyche, our innocence, our future, and it's permanent. China will soon overtake us. I think I would have preferred to be a boomer because then I'd be like 60-75 and I could just be happy with what my country was.

This is going to be my final post on GT. IKM~ Signing Out.

There are 20 Replies


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Over 1 Year ago
[scrubbed]

and indeed the innocence of my childhood.

I've said it many times, but the same was true for me. I was 13 at the time. A lot of administrative dysfunction has followed from that, especially here in America, but I don't see myself as all that great a cynic. There is still opportunity out there for our generation, and the next, to lead productive and happy lives. Until his dying day, my grandfather would tell stories of shooting sparrows out back to have something to make soup with when he was a kid. My other grandfather, whose family was wealthy, would boast about how his grandfather had the means to always have butter on the table. That luxury was lost during the Great Depression when the family money evaporated, but that wasn't the end of the story. Life went on, and his descendants, or at least most of them, are doing okay. I am thankful that he didn't take disaster as an excuse to hurl himself from a high rise, and if he were still alive I expect that he would understand that there is no better time to be alive than right now.

Take care, oi.

Over 1 Year ago
Famov

9/11 ruined the future for Millennials and Gen Z in the west. Most of us will never own homes or be able to retire.



9/11 didn't do that, bruh. I understand your feelings and that perspective makes a lot of sense to feel. But 9/11 ain't why most of us will will never own homes or be able to retire.

Over 1 Year ago
Jet Presto

The big thing 9/11 did imo was lure the US into wasting tons of time, resources, money and lives on the "War on Terror", and it was used as an excuse to establish a far wider reaching spy grid and police state, permanently sacrificing civil liberties for the illusion of security. In that way it weakened us just like Bin Laden wanted.

Over 1 Year ago
pacman

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Over 1 Year ago
[scrubbed]

9/11/2001 was the beginning of my transition from quiet, live-and-let-live, it’s-their-own-affair atheism,
to outspoken, evangelical atheism.
I quit believing that it was polite to let a theist comment just pass without calling it out.

Some beliefs are dangerous to other people, in addition to the believer.

Like “ivermectin prevents COVID but vaccines don’t”.

If someone is asleep, normally it’s probably polite to let them sleep.
But what if they’re driving a bus with you and several other passengers?
Then the polite thing to do is wake them up, no matter how much it pisses them off, or how beautiful a dream you’re interrupting,

The fundamentalists’ and dominionists’ and Christian nationalists’ reaction to the World Trade Center attacks, stacked on top of the WTC Al-Qaeda attacks themselves, convinced me that anyone’s religion is dangerous to everyone..

I think the 1st Amendment needs exceptions or additions.
Either it should limit freedom of speech (more than just “don’t yell “fire!” in the middle of a crowded theater), or it should also protect freedom from religion, or probably both.

Over 1 Year ago
eldin raigmore
 

20 years ago I was 49 yrs 7 mos old. I had been let go from my last job February of 2001.
My older sister had passed away; and my father also.

Over 1 Year ago
chiarizio
 

I do think it's perfectly possible for people to be religious without being dangerous to others. But I think the number of people able to do that is much smaller than the inverse.

Over 1 Year ago
Jet Presto

Until his dying day, my grandfather would tell stories of shooting sparrows out back to have something to make soup with when he was a kid.

I would much rather live like this - off the land, acquiring the things I need directly - than under a boss for wages with which I rent from a landlord and buy food from a corporation. Just seems like there is more dignity and personal freedom in it. Like living on one's own terms rather than merely being allowed to exist conditionally by elites who basically own me.

Over 1 Year ago
pacman

I do think it's perfectly possible for people to be religious without being dangerous to others. But I think the number of people able to do that is much smaller than the inverse.


There are only two religions I trust; Sikhs, and Nizari Ismaili Sevener Shi’ites.

Sikhs have accepted martyrdom to protect the religious freedom of non-Sikhs.

Nizari Ismaili Seveners believe in reason; even over and above scripture such as the Quran.

….

There may be other religions I’d trust if I knew about them.
But these two are the only two I know I’d trust.

Other than that, I think faith is more often than not a mental illness.

Over 1 Year ago
eldin raigmore
 

Unitarians seem pretty ok. But I might also just live in an area where they are ok.

Over 1 Year ago
Jet Presto

September 11,2000 and fun

Over 1 Year ago
NoBananasUpMyAss

@Jet Presto:
You wrote:
Unitarians seem pretty ok. But I might also just live in an area where they are ok.

You’re probably right. Maybe I’ve overlooked them.
There’s two kinds of Unitarians, right? Unitarian Universalists and something else?
I know less than I want to know.

Over 1 Year ago
chiarizio
 

@Jet Presto:
You wrote:
Unitarians seem pretty ok.


I looked them up.
They, like the Nizari Ismaili Seveners, seem also to emphasize the importance of reason. Or at least the ones Wikipedia talks about do or did.
I knew even less than I thought I did, since some of the little I thought I knew was wrong.
So, I guess I should henceforth say, there are three religions I know about that I trust.

I still might not enjoy attending their services.

Over 1 Year ago
chiarizio
 

I think the 1st Amendment needs exceptions or additions.

I think the exceptions that exist are sufficient - libel, slander, threats, lying to consumers, etc. But I think it is a dangerous slippery slope to allow the state to regulate speech beyond that.

Over 1 Year ago
pacman

I would much rather live like this - off the land, acquiring the things I need directly - than under a boss for wages with which I rent from a landlord and buy food from a corporation. Just seems like there is more dignity and personal freedom in it. Like living on one's own terms rather than merely being allowed to exist conditionally by elites who basically own me.

Always and forever, the elites make (most of) the rules, even if the "elite" in question is merely the caveman with the biggest club.

I won't deny the dignity of true self reliance, including independence from modern society with the hyper specialization and complex web of cooperation implicit in that, but I am much too comfortable to envy anyone that has to live that way. I think it's better for other people to do all of the work that I don't know how to do, and for me to earn my way by focusing on the one or two marketable skills that I do have. I never asked my grandfather how good sparrow soup was, but I assume that it wasn't great.

11 Months ago
Famov

It probably didn't leave as much of an impact on me as some people since I was sleeping during it and I woke up later and wondered my mom didn't wake me up for school and I saw her glued to the screen and she didn't answer when I asked why she didn't and I only somewhat understood what was going on.

There may be other religions I’d trust if I knew about them.

Should probably clarify that I'm not urrently religious anymore before I say all of this but.

That's good but I feel like even with the religions you're more familiar with you can sound a bit generalizing even if bigger religions will tend to be more easily corruptible. You mentioned how christians reacted earlier, but if you look at how Jesus responded to a lot of things you'd probably realize that a lot of christians don't actually closely follow him anyway, this it once again becomes clear to me that the problem isn't necessarily with the religion so much as it's a problem with the people and how they interpret or misuse it.

I do think it's perfectly possible for people to be religious without being dangerous to others. But I think the number of people able to do that is much smaller than the inverse.

A lot of religions seem to have harmless tenets so in those cases it's even more clearly down to the person rather than the religion.

Other than that, I think faith is more often than not a mental illness.

Considering religion can be atheistic, and considering that can render religion just another way of life I wonder what the basis for this. Unless you weren't aware of that I guess. Regardless I think it's a bit of a stretch personally to associate it all with mental illness, but then again I think it's a stretch to associate weird supernatural beliefs and other stuff with mental illness. From my view that all depends on how much it's negatively impacting the person's life. Labeling people who believe in things unproven beyond the material to me seems like a step too far. It's one thing to believe in gods or ghosts, it's another thing when you can prove or disprove things and people choose to believe it anyway though and someone is deciding to go with ivermectin over vaccines and putting their life in danger.

11 Months ago
Grey Echelon

What's with the scrubbed posts? Are they moderated posts?

10 Months ago
ShadowFox08

Scrubbed posts are from users who requested that their content be scrubbed during the ownership transfer.

10 Months ago
galbraith

What's with the scrubbed posts? Are they moderated posts?


Like Galbraith was so kind to point out, when Xhin gave the site to WO 1 or two users (if memory serves me right) didn't feel comfortable keeping their data here so Xhin scrubbed it for them before the transfer.

¤LðŗРУŋįd@¤

10 Months ago
Lord Denida

This thread is archived